Profs and Pints has expanded online using the Crowdcast platform to further democratize access to higher learning and provide people access to high-quality scholarly talks while social distancing. Below are both a schedule of upcoming talks and an archive where you can access to the recordings of great talks that you might have missed.  

Upcoming Talks

Recorded talks available for viewing

(Listed in chronological  order, oldest to newest)

Queen Guinevere's Maying, a 1900 painting by John Collier.

The Women of

King Arthur Legends

with Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman, former instructors at The Ohio State University and co-founders of the Carterhaugh School of Folklore and the Fantastic. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

U.S. Route 163 at Monument Valley in Utah.

The Great American

Road Trip

with Allen Pietrobon, assistant professor of Global Affairs at Trinity Washington University and former professorial lecturer of history at American University. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

Children were terrified on ending up in iron lungs during the 1953 polio epidemic. (Photo from Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center, Downey, California.)

Epidemics in American History

with Allen Pietrobon, assistant professor of Global Affairs at Trinity Washington University and former professorial lecturer of history at American University. (This talk remains free, but please share with friends to tell them about Profs and Pints Online.)


 

Benjamin Franklin as depicted in a 1767 painting by David Martin. (Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.)

The Nine Lives of

Benjamin Franklin

with Richard Bell, associate professor of history at the University of Maryland. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

Rusalka and her daughter, an engraving by

I. Volkov published in 1899.

 

Mermaid Tales

a discussion of the enigmatic water spirits of Russia, with folklorist Philippa Rappoport of George Washington University. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

Lars Krutak with Pius, one of the last

Makonde tattoo masters of Mozambique.

(Photo by Lars Krutak.)

A World Heritage of Tattooing

with Dr. Lars Krutak, anthropologist, research associate at the Museum of International Folk Art, co-editor of Ancient Ink: The Archaeology of Tattooing, and former host of the Discovery Channel's Tattoo Hunter. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

Perhaps no one in your neighborhood

is quite as clever.

 

Raccoons Unmasked

with John Hadidian, urban wildlife expert and instructor in natural resources for Virginia Tech. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

An epidemiologist tests blood samples for pertussis during a 2010 outbreak in Ohio. (Photo from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.)

 

Understanding Epidemiology

with Cara Frankenfeld, associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at George Mason University. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

New York City's Deputy Police Commissioner

John A. Leach, right, watches agents waste good liquor on the city's rats following a raid.

(Library of Congress photo.)

 

Speaking of Speakeasies

a discussion of prohibition and its boozy effects, with Allen Pietrobon, assistant professor of Global Affairs at Trinity Washington University and former professorial lecturer of history at American University.

(Talk on sale for $10.) 

Alexander Hamilton as painted by John Trumball and George Washington as painted by

Gilbert Stuart.

 

Hamilton and Washington

a look at history underlying the hit Hamilton musical, with Denver Brunsman, associate professor of history at George Washington University and lecturer at Mount Vernon. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

The Witch, No. 1, c. 1892 lithograph by Joseph E. Baker

 

Witches and Witch Hunts

with Mikki Brock, associate professor of history at Washington and Lee University and scholar of demonology, witchcraft, and early modern Scotland. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

Social distancing will be difficult in slums such as this one in Kenya, where droughts linked to climate change have exacerbated poverty and fueled migration from the countryside to cities. (Photo by Claudio Allia.)

Coronavirus and

Climate Change

with Olufemi Taiwo, assistant professor of philosophy at Georgetown University and scholar of postcolonialism and issues related to environmental justice. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

Norma McCorvey (Jane Roe) and her lawyer Gloria Allred on the steps of the Supreme Court, 1989. (Photo by Lorie Shaull.)

Before and After

Roe v. Wade

with Sara Matthiesen, professor of history and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at George Washington University. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

Cthulhu as rendered by the artist Benoît Stella

 

Cthulhu and the Klan

a look at H.P. Lovecraft’s race problem, with Peter Herman. lecturer of theology and religious studies at Marymount University and scholar of religious and social themes in science fiction. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

Take a class that will help you win over friends in Ireland if you travel there.

 

Intro to Gaelic

with Jennifer O’Riordan, native of Cork and former assistant director of Irish Studies and Irish language instructor at Catholic University. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

“The Plague at Ashdod,” a 1630 painting by Nicolas Poussin.

Covid-19, Humans, and Pandemics

with Rui Diogo, associate professor of anatomy at Howard University's College of Medicine and resource faculty member at George Washington University's Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

A bank run early in the Great Depression.

(Social Security Administration photo.)

Our Current Crash and Economic History

with Trevor Jackson, assistant professor of economic history at George Washington University and teacher of courses on inequality and economic crises. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

Voting booths might go unused if people cannot get to them safely and end up voting by mail instead. (Image from myinfo.alambamavotes.gov)

Covid-19 and

Election 2020

a look at our politics in the midst of pandemic, with David Barker, professor of government and director of the Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies at American University. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

Asian Americans were involved with the Black Panther Party in a period when social movements conceived of identity in broader terms.

How the Elite Captured Identity Politics

with Olufemi Táíwò , assistant professor of political philosophy and ethics at Georgetown University and scholar of activism and the black radical tradition. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

Some of us complain about "herding cats," but the Norwegian goddess Freya managed to get cats to pull her chariot.

 

Folkloric Felines

a look at cats in folklore and fairy tales,

with Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman, former instructors at The Ohio State University and

co-founders of The Carterhaugh School of Folklore and the Fantastic. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

The political power of John D. Rockefeller was the target of this Horace Taylor cartoon published in The Verdict, a magazine from his era.

Make America

Gilded Again?

a look at America’s “Gilded Age” and how

it compares to our current time, with

Allen Pietrobon, assistant professor of

Global Affairs at Trinity Washington University and former professorial lecturer of history at American University. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

Five-Way Portrait of Marcel Duchamp, 1917. (National Portrait Gallery.)

The Art of

Marcel Duchamp

with Lisa Lipinski, assistant professor of art history at the George Washington University’s Corcoran School of the Arts and Design and teacher of a graduate art history seminar on Duchamp and his legacy there.(Talk on sale for $10.) 

Bob Marley performing at Dublin's Dalymount Park in 1980. (Photo by Eddie Malin/Wikimedia Commons)

 

Lessons from Bob Marley

an insider’s perspective on a musical revolutionary and healer, with Vivien Goldman, a New York University adjunct professor who teaches a course on Bob Marley and is the author of two books on him.(Talk on sale for $10.) 

Silk Road explorer Aurel Stein and his team in the Taklamakan Desert, 1908. M. Aurel Stein, Ruins of Desert Cathay: Personal Narrative of Explorations in Central Asia and Westernmost China, vol. 2 (London: Macmillan, 1912)

Meet the Real

Indiana Jones

with Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University and author of Indiana Jones in History: From Pompeii to the Moon. (Talk on sale for $10.)  

A soldier stands guard on the corner of 7th & N Street NW in Washington D.C. near smoldering buildings destroyed during the 1968 unrest over the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Urban Uprisings

Then and Now

with Ashley Howard, assistant professor of history and African American studies at the University of Iowa, former assistant professor of history at Loyola University New Orleans, and scholar of urban unrest in the 1960s. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

A mass arrest of Hong Kong protesters in May. (Photo by Studio Incendo/Wikipedia Commons.) 

Hong Kong—Laboratory for Cold War?

with Robert Daly, director of the Wilson Center's Kissinger Institute on China and the United States. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

Brothel, a 1562 painting by the Flemish artist Joachim Beuckelaer. 

 

Saints and Harlots

a look at women and sexuality in premodern

Europe, with Amy Leonard, associate professor of history at Georgetown University and author of

Nails in the Wall: Catholic Nuns in Reformation Germany. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

The AIDS Memorial Quilt laid out beside

the Washington Monument.

(National Institutes of Health photo.)

Applying AIDS

Lessons to Covid-19

with Joseph Osmundson, professor of biology at New York University, expert on molecular microbiology, author, and queer activist. (Talk on sale for $10.) 

Julie Newmar as Catwoman in 1966, during the first season of the Batman television series.

 

On Gender and Cats

a feminist exploration of how we think about felines, with Crys Stuvland, lecturer at Howard University and scholar of cats in popular culture. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

Police patrol Ferguson, Missouri, during protests over the 2014 killing of Michael Brown by a police officer. (Photo by Jamelle Bouie.)

 

On the Abolition of Police

with Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò, assistant professor of philosophy at Georgetown University and scholar of activism, anti-colonial thought, and the Black Radical Tradition. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

A belted kingfisher as painted by

John James Audubon.

 

The Wonder of Birds

an introduction to the basics of ornithology, with Peter English, scholar of avian biology and behavior, bird guide, and assistant professor of biology at the University of Texas at Austin. (Talk on sale for $10.)

 

From a police mug shot taken of Josef Stalin in 1902, when he was 23 years old.

 

What Drives Dictators

with Dean Haycock, neurobiologist, former

instructor at Brown University, and author of both Tyrannical Minds and Murderous Minds. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

Lin-Manuel Miranda in the title role of his musical Hamilton, April 20, 2016.

(Photo by Steve Jurvetson.)

 

Hamilton’s History Remix

a critical look at the musical and the people and events it depicts, with Richard Bell, associate professor of history at the University of Maryland. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

The May 2017 removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee from Lee Circle in New Orleans. (Wikimedia Commons.)

 

Monumental Controversies

with Fred Bohrer, professor of art and archaeology at Hood College, art historian, and creator of the website Monumental Anxiety: An Anti-Guide to the Monuments of Washington, D.C. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

A Sam Droege photograph of Augochlorella aurata, a common bee of the eastern North America.

 

Portraits of Bees

with Sam Droege, biologist at the U.S.G.S. Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, developer of online identification guides to native bees, and guest lecturer at colleges and universities. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

From a portrait of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton painted by Ralph Earl in 1787. (Museum of the City of New York.)

 

The Women of Hamilton

with Cassandra Good, assistant professor of history at Marymount University and author of Founding Friendships: Friendships Between Men and Women in the Early American Republic. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

A tiger shark off of the Bahamas.

(Photo by Albert Kok.)

 

The Fight to Save Sharks

with David Shiffman, marine conservation biologist, environmental policy consultant, and adjunct instructor at Arizona State University’s New College.(Talk on sale for $10.) 
 

Pope Francis in 2014. (Photo by Jeffrey Bruno / Wikimedia Commons.)

 

The Mind of Pope Francis

a guide to understanding the current pontiff, with Brian Flanagan, associate professor of theology at Marymount University and author of Stumbling in Holiness: Sin and Sanctity in the Church. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

An unknown artist's 1789 illustration of the Women's March on Versailles .

Women and the

French Revolution

a look at feminism's role and rise in France’s transformative conflict, with Amy Leonard, associate professor of history at Georgetown University. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

“Tartini's Dream,” an 1894 illustration by

Louis Léopold Boilly of the legend behind Giuseppe Tartini's “Devil's Trill Sonata.”

 

Speak of the Devil

a discussion of Satan over the ages, with Mikki Brock, associate professor of history at W & L University and scholar of demonology, witchcraft, and early modern Scotland. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

A very British wedding cake.

 

Britain Beneath the Frosting

a look at Brexit, baking shows, and other ingredients of a troubled empire, with Sam Wetherell, lecturer on British and World History at the University of York. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

An aerial photo of 1950s suburban development in Levittown, Pennsylvania.

The Truth Behind White Picket Fences

a look at racism and other harsh realities in the idealized 1950s American suburb, with Allen Pietrobon, assistant professor of Global Affairs at Trinity Washington University. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

Image taken from "Am Not I a Man and a Brother," by an unknown artist. Design commissioned by the Committee for the Abolition of the Slave Trade in 1787.

 

How Scientists Begat Racism

with Rui Diogo, associate professor of anatomy at Howard University's College of Medicine and resource faculty member at George Washington University's Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

“Fairies in a Bird's Nest,” an 1860 painting by

John Anster Fitzgerald.

 

Folktales of Summer Forests

with Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman, former instructors at The Ohio State University and co-founders of the Carterhaugh School of Folklore and the Fantastic. (Talk on sale for $10.)
 

George Washington, who served as president of the Constitutional Convention, is shown among slaves at Mount Vernon in this 1853 lithograph based on a painting by Junius Brutus Stearns. (Library of Congress.)

The Wickedness of the Three-Fifths Clause

a deep dive into the troubling hidden history of the 1787 federal Constitution, with Rick Bell, professor of history at the University of Maryland.
 

Notorious serial killer Ted Bundy faces murder charges in a Miami courtroom in 1979. ( Photo by Donn Dughi / Florida Memory Project. )

Exploring the

Psychopathic Brain

with Dean Haycock, neurobiologist, former instructor at Brown University, and author of Murderous Minds, Exploring the Criminal Psychopathic Brain.
 

Armed militia members gather at Michigan 's statehouse to protest against Covid-19 related health restrictions.

Paramilitaries as Constitutional Threats

with Mary McCord, visiting professor and legal director at Georgetown Law’s Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection.
 

Both nature and nurture shape relations between the sexes, but exactly how and how much they do so might surprise you.

 

Sex, Misogyny and Evolution

with Rui Diogo, associate professor of anatomy at Howard University's College of Medicine and resource faculty member at George Washington University's Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology.
 

An 1879 photo of Frederick Douglass by

George Kendall Warren.

(National Archives and Records Administration)

The Fire of

Frederick Douglass

a dramatic look at the life of the greatest American of the 19th century, with Rick Bell, professor of history at the University of Maryland.  
 

Game theory can help you make the right move in checkers and in real life.

 

Survival Through Math

an introduction to game theory as a tool for navigating crises, with Anna Weltman, former graduate instructor at the University of California at Berkeley and author of Supermath: The Power of Mathematics For Good and Evil.
 

Minnesota State Police troopers patrol in response to unrest following the killing of George Floyd. (Photo by Tony Webster.)

 

On Defunding the Police

an introduction to the concepts of police defunding and police abolition, with Alex S. Vitale, professor of sociology at Brooklyn College and author of The End of Policing.
 

Lansing, Michigan's state capital, where partisan tensions have run high this year.

 

The Battle for Michigan

a look at politics in a key swing state, with David Dulio, professor of political science and director of the Center for Civic Engagement at Oakland University.
 

A protest following the election of Donald Trump, who lost the popular vote while winning the electoral college. (Image from Democracy Now.)

Crash Course on the Electoral College

with Denver Brunsman, associate professor of history at George Washington University.
 

A rare Saint Francis Satyr butterfly, found almost entirely on a military base in North Carolina. (Photo by USGS Bee Inventory and

Monitoring Lab )

 

Rescuing Rare Butterflies

with Nick Haddad, who researches butterflies as a professor of integrative biology at Michigan State University and senior terrestrial ecologist at the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station and is the author of The Last Butterflies: A Scientist's Quest to Save a Rare and Vanishing Creature.


 

An image from a World War I propaganda

poster that encouraged rationing.

A History of

American Dining

or what we can learn from our nation’s past in a time of culinary crisis, with Allen Pietrobon, assistant professor of Global Affairs at Trinity Washington University and former professorial lecturer of history at American University.


 

A McDonald's on a city street.

(Photo by Jeramey Jannene.)

 

Race and Fast Food

with Marcia Chatelain, professor of history and African American studies at Georgetown University and author of Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America.


 

A photo of unidentified origin commonly circulated to illustrate the creepy online folktale “The Expressionless.”

Slenderman and Other Internet Folklore

with Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman, former instructors at The Ohio State University and co-founders of The Carterhaugh School of Folklore and the Fantastic.


 

The shelves of a supermarket in Franklin Farm, Virginia, after it was cleared out by panic-buying in March. (Photo by Famartin / Wikipedia Commons. Alteration with framing shadows by Profs and Pints.)

 

Meltdown on Aisle Twenty

look at panic-buying, hostility to outsiders, and other evolved responses to crises, with Stephanie D. Preston, professor of psychology at the University of Michigan.


 

The Me Too movement has brought more attention to sexual assault, but the criminal justice system remains a fraught place for victims seeking redress. Can restorative justice be a better option for them? (Photo by surdumihail / Pixabay)

Restorative Justice and Sexual Assault

with Lara Bazelon, law professor and director of the criminal and juvenile justice and racial justice clinics at the University of San Francisco and author of Rectify: The Power of Restorative Justice After Wrongful Conviction.


 

A Bannik, or Russian bathhouse spirit, as drawn by Ivan Bilibin in 1934. (Wikimedia Commons)

 

Spirits Around the Place

a look at Russian beliefs in supernatural creatures and their homes, with folklorist Philippa Rappoport of George Washington University.


 

John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon following their nationally televised debate on Sept. 26, 1960. (Associated Press photo.)

 

The Debate of the Century

a look at how Kennedy vs. Nixon changed American presidential politics, with Allen Pietrobon, assistant professor of Global Affairs at Trinity Washington University and former professorial lecturer of history at American University.


 

Photo is a signal that what we have been doing is failing to satisfy our need to feel engaged. (Photo by Marco Verch.)

 

Overcoming Boredom

with James Danckert, who researches boredom as a professor of psychology and cognitive neuroscience at the University of Waterloo.


 

A full moon over the Chinese city of Xi'an. Can you see the moon goddess or the jade rabbit? (Photo by Dave Morrow).

 

A Feast of China's Lore

an autumnal exploration of the Chinese tradition’s myths, folktales, and Moon Festival, with Robert Daly, director of the Wilson Center’s Kissinger Institute on China and the United States and frequent lecturer on Chinese culture.


 

The forces of good and evil clash on the side of Notre Dame cathedral.

Humans—Naturally

Good, or Bad?

with Rui Diogo, associate professor of anatomy at Howard University’s College of Medicine and resource faculty member at George Washington University’s Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology.


 

The official portrait of the U.S. Supreme Court going into its session that began October 5, 2020 was taken before the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, shown seated in the front row, second from left. (Fred Schilling, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States.)

Supreme Court at a Crossroads

with David Fontana, professor of law at the George Washington University, scholar of the Supreme Court, and frequent writer on constitutional issues.


 

A 1944 picture of members of the Maquis, a subset of the French Resistance that included socialists, communists, and anarchists. (Photo by Donald I. Grant, Department of National Defence, Canada / Collection of Library and Archives Canada )

 

The Origins of Antifa

with Mark Bray, lecturer in history at Rutgers University, political organizer, and author of Antifa and Translating Anarchy.


 

The flag of the African Union.

Outsiders Wreak

Havoc in Africa

with Elizabeth Schmidt, professor of history at

Loyola University Maryland and author of

Foreign Intervention in Africa after the Cold War.


 

Image from the original Warner Brothers Studios poster promoting the film The Exorcist.

 

The Exorcist's Power

with David Wilt, professorial lecturer in film studies at George Washington University.


 

“Wheat Field,” a 1919 painting of the Battle of Belleau Wood by Frank Schoonover.

 

The Battle of Belleau Wood

a discussion of courage and sacrifice in the summer of 1918, with Edward Lengel, chief historian of the National Medal of Honor Museum, former professor at the University of Virginia, and author of several books on World War I military history.


 

A 1720 political cartoon from an unknown artist depicting Scottish speculator John Law, who was said to have the ability to sell people the wind. (Wikimedia Commons.)

Centuries of

Financial Scandal

with Trevor Jackson, assistant professor of economic history at George Washington University.


 

Young African American people gathered at a Black Lives Matter protest. (Photo by Orna Wachman / Pixabay )

 

Black Votes as Swing Votes

an assumption-shattering look at the political behavior of young African Americans, with David Barker, professor of government and director of the Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies at American University.


 

George Washington and his cabinet: Secretary of War Henry Knox, Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton, Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, and Attorney General Edmund Randolph. Lithograph by Currier and Ives. (Library of Congress.)

 

Inside Presidents' Cabinets

a look at the role of advising the highest office, with Lindsay Chervinsky, scholar of the presidency and professorial lecturer at the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University.


 

A Japanese Yuki-onna, or snow spirit, as depicted in the 1737 Hyakkai-Zukan, or book of demons, by Sawaki Suushi.

 

Japanese Ghost Stories

with Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman, former instructors at Ohio State University and co-founders of The Carterhaugh School of Folklore and the Fantastic.


 

A mural painted on the walls of a Buddhist monastery in Thailand depicts a monk meditating on a corpse. (Photo by Justin McDaniel.)

 

Horror in the East

a look at truly frightening Buddhist beliefs and rituals, with Justin McDaniel, professor of religious studies at the University of Pennsylvania, founder of the Penn Ghost Project, and former Buddhist monk.


 

A traditional Irish jack-o-lantern carved from a turnip on display in the National Museum of Ireland.

A Summoning of

Halloweens Past

with Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman, former instructors at Ohio State University and co-founders of the Carterhaugh School of Folklore and the Fantastic.


 

The devil baptizes a sorcerer as others await their turn in this engraving from the 1626 Compendium Maleficarum, by Francesco Maria Guazzo of Italy.

 

The War on Warlocks

a look at the hunt for male witches in early modern France, with Thomas Rushford, professor of history at Northern Virginia Community College and scholar of witch trials in France and England.


 

A Dune illustration depicting the Bene Gesserit Sisters' training academy.

 

Faith on Dune

a look at religion in science fiction and fantasy, with Peter Herman, lecturer of theology and religious studies at Marymount University and scholar of religious and social themes in those genres.


 

Vasilisa the Beautiful at the hut of Baba Yaga. (Illustration by Ivan Bilibin.)

 

Tales from Netherworlds

an evening with Baba Yaga and other dark denizens of the imagination, with folklorist Philippa Rappoport of George Washington University.


 

Edgar Allan Poe, as depicted in a drawing made from a daguerreotype by Mathew Brady. (National Archives at College Park.)

 

Poe's Mastery of Horror

with Hal Poe, professor of faith and culture at Union University, former president of the Edgar Allan Poe Museum of Richmond, and author of Edgar Allan Poe: An Illustrated Companion to his Tell-Tale Stories and Evermore: Edgar Allan Poe and the Mystery of the Universe.


 

An image from the 1922 German expressionist film Nosferatu, which was directed by F. W. Murnau and starred Max Schreck as the vampire Count Orlok.

 

When Vampires Arose

with Bruce McClelland, former instructor

at the University of Virginia and author of

Slayers and Their Vampires: A Cultural History of Killing the Dead.


 

A 1518 painting by Johann Jakob Wick of three witches being burned in Baden, Switzerland.

What Sparked

Witch Burnings

a look at the origins of Europe and North America's witch trials, with Richard Kieckhefer, professor of religious studies and history at Northwestern University and author of European Witch Trials and Magic in the Middle Ages.


 

An ad for Protose, one of the first meat substitutes to be made widely commercially available.

 

A History of Meat Mimicry

with Adam Shprintzen, associate professor of

history at Marywood University and author of

The Vegetarian Crusade: The Rise of an American Reform.


 

A NASA illustration of the Keplar Telescope, which aids the search for extrasolar planets.

 

The Search for Alien Life

with Jason Wright, professor of astronomy and astrophysics and director of the Extraterrestrial Intelligence Center at Pennsylvania State University


 

A 19th-century illustration of Madame d'Aulnoy's fairy tale "The Blue Bird." (Artist unknown/ Wikimedia Commons.)

 

Fairy Tales of French Salons

with Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman, former instructors at Ohio State University and co-founders of the Carterhaugh School of Folklore and the Fantastic.


 

Joan of Arc's death at the stake, as depicted as part of an 1843 triptych by Hermann Stilke.

Gods, Evolution, Conspiracies, and Belief

a biology-based look at how humans have long made sense of their worlds, with Rui Diogo, associate professor of anatomy at Howard University’s College of Medicine and resource faculty member at George Washington University’s Center for the Advanced Study of Hominid Paleobiology.


 

Profs and Pints talks are a great way to introduce young people to various academic fields. Please note, however, that all talks are delivered on an adult level and may feature mature content. 

A note from Profs and Pints CEO Peter Schmidt about diversity among presenters:

In my recruitment of speakers I am committed to diversity in all of its forms, including gender, race, and ideological orientation. I encourage any college faculty member interested in being featured by Profs and Pints to click this link for important background on the lectures and workshops that Profs and Pints offers and to email profsandpints@hotmail.com for additional information on how to apply.

Profs and Pints Online Terms and Conditions. 

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